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Saturday, May 28, 2016
The Mexican War is coming
Posted Thursday, May 26, at 11:47 AM
Mexico would not give up Texas after the Battle of San Jacinto. It continued to claim the country and was very angry when the United States took it into the Union. At the same time, the United States was angry with Mexico because it wouldn't agree to pay for injuries which some of its American citizens had received in Mexico. ...

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Blood of old frontiersmen heading to Oregon
Posted Thursday, April 28, at 1:57 PM

Our Nation is growing up. Missionaries are following the fur traders. While Andrew Jackson was President, some Indians from Oregon came to St. Louis and asked for missionaries to come and teach them the whiteman's "Book of Heaven," the Bible. They were hearing stories of John, Paul, and Jesus, and being washed in the blood...

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Americans' life changes: travel, inventions, and discoveries
Posted Thursday, March 24, at 4:10 PM

For nearly 200 years after the first settlers landed at Jamestown, people lived year after year in much the same way. They traveled on horses and stagecoaches, in canoes and sail boats. Their mail was slow and uncertain, to say the least. They had no factories and had to buy factory-made goods in Europe. ...

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Our country's foundation growing
Posted Thursday, February 25, at 2:19 PM

When the new government was accepted, all eyes turned toward George Washington. He was elected again and served out eight years. and had two very important tasks to perform. First, get enough money to pay the old debts of the government. Second, to get governments and people of European countries to treat the United States and its people properly. ...

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Constitution: the Union is saved
Posted Friday, February 12, at 1:09 PM

The Vice President doesn't think we need the Constitution. But even back in 1776, nine states said we did. They approved the Constitution. All sorts of objections were raised to the new plan of government. Men gathered in the taverns and village stores to debate and argue about every part of the plan. Everywhere the members of the Convention were going, they were urging the people to accept...

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A lesson on our Constitution
Posted Friday, February 5, at 2:30 PM

This will be a short story about why we need our Constitution. Here is the rest of the story: When the thirteen colonies declared their independence and separated from England, they needed some sort of government to keep them united and help them to work together. They looked to the Continental Congress for orders and advice, but after the war was over, the different states paid less and less attention to the Continental Congress...

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Taking life to its next level
Posted Friday, January 29, at 2:00 PM

We all need to understand that the force of life is the drive for fulfillment; we all have a need to experience a life of meaning. Fulfillment can only be achieved through a pattern of living in which we focus on our spiritual needs. There are three C's of Life: Choices, Chances, and Changes. ...

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Genealogy can cause sleep deprivation
Posted Thursday, January 21, at 11:15 AM

When you lie down, your sleep will be sweet. --Proverbs 3:24. How many of you have a family line that when you start to research, you end up staying up day and night working on them? Your spouse comes by and asks you if you're going to eat dinner with the rest of the family. ...

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The purpose of pain
Posted Friday, January 8, at 1:20 PM

I have learned that pain has a purpose, which at the peak of discomfort, brings us little consolation. Although hindsight has often proven our pain's value. In fact, I have found pain to be one of life's most effective teachers in our lives. My grandmother seems to find a way to pick up the pieces, always believing things will get better. ...

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Family Heirlooms and creating Legacy
Posted Thursday, December 31, at 12:09 PM

"I don't think that woman knows what she's talking about," my grandmother would say. "What woman?" I asked, confused as all get-out. "There are no women here except me and you." My 85-year-old grandmother was surrounded on the seat of our car by maps she toted everywhere. ...

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Etiquette for genealogists
Posted Friday, December 11, at 2:22 PM

First, let me advise all patrols of libraries: notice this is a service provided to you. Let's keep the welcome mat out to all who enter these repositories. Come prepared: Equip yourself with pencils (pens are not allowed in an archival setting), paper, and change for copiers, printers, parking fees, research fees, and/or a donation to the repository...

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The Good Ole Days
Posted Thursday, December 3, at 3:10 PM

Are their still those of you who remember the Good Ole Days? When the shade of a tree and the company of a neighbor helped lighten the dreary chore of family washday years ago. I remember being three years old and traveling down Speedway in Trumann in a Washtub Ringer Washtub, going to my Grandma's house, Ollie Wadlington Adams. Those were the good ole days...

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Maps, maps, which way do I go?
Posted Thursday, November 12, at 2:10 PM

Where was that located, and what year is that map? Do we have a map with that town on it? Just a few questions genealogists want to know when they find the location of their ancestor. I love to travel. I immediately try to find out everything I can about the area I'm going to. ...

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America's birthplace: Jamestown
Posted Thursday, October 15, at 3:23 PM

Declining Jamestown was the end of the means. The Church, the State House and several other Jamestown structures were rebuilt, and many of Bacon's followers were pardoned, "As His Majesty hath forgot it himself". It remained an omen of a larger revolt against tyranny which was to come one hundred years later (The American Revolution). ...

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Jamestown: Bacon's Rebellion 1676
Posted Thursday, October 8, at 3:48 PM

The English were excellent shipbuilders, and in the new land waterways were the best means of travel. On April 27, 1607, the very day after the Jamestown colonists landed at Cape Henry, some of the settlers began to build or assemble small boats as carriers for people or small animals. ...

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Jamestown industries: agriculture, fisherman, and silk culture
Posted Thursday, October 1, at 3:53 PM

The land was cruel as it had been in the first years. Farming was quite cruel compared to what it is in the 21st century. During the 17th century, there were years of good crops, but more often there were years of meager crops. Some seeds and plants brought from England thrived in the rich humus where others died in the soil...

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Jamestown Industries 1607-1700: Pottery and Wine Making
Posted Thursday, September 24, at 2:54 PM

A potter was a profession and was not only an art but a necessity. One of the most noble jobs was to be a potter. In the first years, earthen jars of many and varied shapes were needed to store food. The potter not only created containers but made each one an expression of his art. ...

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Jamestown industries in the New World
Posted Thursday, September 10, at 2:53 PM

In this article I will try to explain the different exhibits of Early American industries. At Jamestown, there is a shop where the first glassblowers of 1608 still have a full operation today for visitors like you and I to benefit. Not far from the original spot where the first glassblowers sat are remains of the furnace of the first glass factory that was found there. ...

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Jamestown: first city of industries
Posted Thursday, September 3, at 3:06 PM

If you visit the area of Jamestown today, the state has a five mile scenic wilderness road, like a figure eight, which exhibits Early American Industries. There are pamphlets that show the assumed location of the original fort at Jamestown. The shore has been washed away by the river. The Old Church Tower, center, and the site of Jamestown with its foundations are included in this five mile tour...

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Settlements, marriages, people, and government
Posted Thursday, August 27, at 1:51 PM

By 1624, plantations and settlements where all up and down the shores of the James River for over a 100 miles, or at least as far as the eye could see. This was territory of magisterial government with Jamestown as its capital. But just a few years before the settlements got their start, an event happen that brought some peace to the area: the marriage of Pocahontas. ...

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Ms. Genealogy
Sylvia Evans
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Hot topics
The Mexican War is coming
(0 ~ 11:47 AM, May 26)

Blood of old frontiersmen heading to Oregon
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Clampitt continued
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The Clampitt Saga Part One
(1 ~ 5:19 PM, Apr 11)

Americans' life changes: travel, inventions, and discoveries
(0 ~ 4:10 PM, Mar 24)